Hollywood South News with Jabari: Local film made in New Orleans about crime is getting big attention!

Hollywood-South-News-Jabari

NEW ORLEANS (WGNO) –

NOLA Life

A local man who was once a juvenile offender who is now an actor, producer, activist, and educator has used his gifts to make the world a better place through motion picture.

Ameer Baraka will take you through corrupt police precincts and some of the toughest streets in New Orleans in his new drama-thriller web series called NOLA Life.

Since the upload of the first episode, they’ve had over 700,000 hits and still counting.

To see the first episode CLICK HERE.

Actor-writer Ameer Baraka on his rise from prison to Hollywood

baraka

Growing up in the streets of New Orleans, Ameer Baraka found himself in constant trouble with the law, which eventually led to his incarceration. Through inspiration and determination he has turned his life around. He is now an author, activist and actor. Baraka hopes that in sharing his struggle, he can encourage others.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW

Hollywood South News with Jabari: Local film made in New Orleans about crime is getting big attention!

A local man who was once a juvenile offender who is now an actor, producer, activist, and educator has used his gifts to make the world a better place through motion picture.

Ameer Baraka will take you through corrupt police precincts and some of the toughest streets in New Orleans in his new drama-thriller web series called NOLA Life.

Since the upload of the first episode, they’ve had over 700,000 hits and still counting.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

Inside Out: Young Offenders Find Focus, Peace, Purpose

FOX 8 WVUE New Orleans News, Weather, Sports, Social

Criminal justice leaders discuss ‘St. Slammany,’ sentencing alternatives at Mandeville forum

Warden_listen

Burl Cain, Warden of Angola, listens to Ameer Baraka, a former convict and now actor and teacher, during a morning of discussion about the high rates of incarceration and recidivism in St. Tammany and in Louisiana, their contributing factors and potential solutions sponsored by Leadership St. Tammany at the Pontchartrain Yacht Club in Mandeville Tuesday, October 7, 2014. (David Grunfeld, NOLA.com / The

By Heather Nolan, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

See full slideshow here

 

 

Ameer Baraka, High incarceration rates and the impact in St. Tammany Parish

Ameer Baraka, former convict and now actor and teacher, during a morning of discussion about the high rates of incarceration and recidivism in St. Tammany and in Louisiana, their contributing factors and potential solutions sponsored by Leadership St. Tammany at the Pontchartrain Yacht Club in Mandeville Tuesday, October 7, 2014. (David Grunfeld, NOLA.com / The Times-Picayune)

See photo slide show here

By David Grunfeld, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

Ameer Baraka to be part of conference on parish’s high incarceration

Local experts will discuss the high rates of incarceration and recidivism in our parish and state, their contributing factors, and potential solutions at an interactive conference for alumni of the St. Tammany Leadership (West) Program from 8 a.m. to 11:30 AM Oct. 7 at the Pontchartrain Yacht Club in old Mandeville.

By NOLA Community

Read full story here.

Landrieu launches effort to help unemployed black men find jobs

Hoping to reverse long-standing trends that have left New Orleans’ black population — particularly black men — at an economic disadvantage, the city unveiled an initiative Monday aimed at connecting the most needy job seekers with work opportunities.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu said New Orleans, like the state and federal governments, has done a poor job in providing a full-service conduit linking those in search of jobs to those with jobs to offer. The administration is betting on Monday’s introduction of a new initiative, the Economic Opportunity Strategy, to fill that gap.

The initiative was launched in response to a report released last year by Loyola University that found more than half of working-age African-American men in New Orleans were unemployed in 2011. The study, published by the university’s Lindy Boggs National Center for Community Literacy, tracked a decline in economic opportunity for black New Orleanians over three decades.

In 1980, according to the study, 63 percent of working-age black men had jobs, 7 percent were unemployed and 30 percent had dropped out of the workforce, a category that includes those who are in prison or who have stopped looking for work. By 2011, the combined categories of black men who were unemployed or out of the labor force had jumped to 52 percent.

Read More Here

BY JAQUETTA WHITE|

‘American Horror Story: Coven’s’ Minotaur is New Orleans actor Ameer Baraka

American Horror Story

American Horror Story: Coven.' (FX)

Becoming “American Horror Story: Coven’s” Minotaur isn’t the most striking transformation New Orleans actor Ameer Baraka has undergone. Which is not to say it’s easy: Four hours in a makeup chair, then hours more sitting bolt upright and nearly naked on the freezing set to keep the anchoring gear for the prosthetic, radio-controlled Minotaur head in place between takes makes for a long workday.

“I was excited to work with prosthetics, because I’d never really done it before,” Baraka said. “I was very, very excited until around the second day.

“It was tough being in that suit. You’re just dying to get it off, the head part. It’s extremely hot in there because there’s no cooling system. There’s an electrical system that makes the ears move and everything. You’re constantly hearing this ‘woo-woo-wooing.’ You can’t hear anything outside, but inside the mask you hear that.

“I see why people like Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence get paid so much. Having that on all day, it’s horrible.”

And wonderful. Baraka, who has had recent TV roles on “Treme” and “Breakout Kings” while also building a credits list of film roles and modeling jobs and partnering in a production company, is getting to work in his hometown with the “Coven” company of actors, a powerhouse lineup that includes Kathy Bates,Jessica Lange and Angela Bassett.

Baraka made his debut on the show in its premiere episode, playing a slave who sparks the ire of Bates’ evil character, based on French Quarter ghost-tour specter Madame Delphine LaLaurie.

By Dave Walker, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

Read full story here

 

Candid discussion on crisis facing black males at Essence Fest

New Orleans, La. — There was a candid discussion on the plight of young African-American males at the Morial Convention Center as part of the first day of the Essence Festival.

Musical entrepreneur Master P, actor/producer Ameer Baraka and others took part in the Saving Our Sons empowerment seminar Thursday.

“To see my brother lying in that casket… I said, ‘Mom, I don’t want to put you through this, that’s why I’m going to change my life,'” said Master P, whose real name is Percy Miller.

None of the participants held back.

“At the age of 14 years old I killed another guy because he was selling drugs in my project,” said Baraka.

He and Master P have something in common. Both called the B.W. Cooper, formerly the Calliope Housing Development, home. But neither gives the city’s young males an excuse for taking the wrong path in life.

“I don’t blame my momma, my daddy, any mistakes I made in life, I blame me,” said Master P to loud applause.

Master P told the audience that he could have blown his chance at real success. “When I rode through that project and had [Lil] Romeo sitting in that car seat with me, and what I was into, I had to realize I don’t want my son to be into this, so I ‘m going to have to make a change,” he said.

His son Romeo, a TV actor and rapper, took the stage, as did Master P’s daughter, who sings as well.

Baraka, who had a role in HBO’s “Treme” series, said while incarcerated an older male changed his life with positive words. Now he is committed to raising awareness and telling it straight when it comes to some of society’s ills.

“[A] black woman shouldn’t be pregnant for a drug dealer, are you crazy?  You’re pregnant and he’s a drug dealer, that’s a disaster waiting to happen. Get out of that, there’s no hope in a drug dealer,” said Baraka.

Written by: Sabrina Wilson

Read full story and see video here

Master P and Ameer visit Booker T. Washington in New Orleans

Inside his old high school gym in Central City, rap impresario Percy “Master P” Miller on Wednesday asked more than 150 students to raise their hands if they had plans to go to college.

Devin McFadden, 16, left his hands down.

“What’s wrong? Why don’t you want to go to college?” Miller asked. Devin, with about 300 eyeballs locked on him, joked, “I just didn’t feel like raising my hand.”

An impassioned Miller warned, “You got to know what you want. … Half the guys I grew up with are dead or in prison. They all didn’t know what they wanted.”

Miller, along with local actor Ameer Baraka and California businessman Johnel Langerston, met with students at Hope Academy, a state-run alternative school operating on the old Booker T. Washington High School campus. Langerston is president of Urban Born, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit organization that sponsored the talk. Read more →

Ameer appears on 98.5 WYLD FM Radio in New Orleans

Ameer Baraka kicked it with AD Berry on last week.  Take a listen…

ameer baracka talks

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